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The world of computer aided design allows technical thinkers to bring their own form of creativity to life with the use of cutting edge software and technical design techniques.

Stephen Blackburn Design offers two professional level courses using Autodesk REVIT software.

If you’re a beginner choose the REVIT Fundamentals course that provides a thorough overview of the software and techniques used.  More advanced designers with previous experience with REVIT will want to consider the BIM with REVIT course.  Details for both are below.

Enhance your computer design expertise

REVIT brings a new level of design capabilities to traditional 3d design. REVIT supports the requirements for building information modeling (BIM).

Understand REVIT Parametric Modeling

Learn REVIT’s ability to coordinate all elements in your project and make automatic adjustments to all as you or colleagues make updates in the project.

Learn REVIT's Three Modeling Elements

Model, Datum and View-Specific elements grouped into families that contain the geometric parameters that define your design.

Will 2-d CAD Dissapear?

The advancements in a product like REVIT have transformed the AEC industry. Most modern designers are doing products using a BIM standard. You should be part of this transformation.

Autodesk REVIT Architecture Fundamentals

AutoDesk Revit Basics:

  • Setting up your project
  • Defining grids and levels
  • Inserting CAD files (as underlays and for details)
  • Setting up your Revit template file – customized for your needs
  • Introduction to Revit tags (for Sections, Elevations and other needs)
  • 2D drawing tools – you don’t have to draw everything in 3D!
  • Annotation and Dimensioning

Nuts-and-Bolts Revit training for Architecture:

  • Creating floor plans
  • Creating building elevations
  • Cutting sections
  • Setting up and placing views
  • Setting up sheets and plotting
  • Placing walls, doors, windows, etc.
  • Creating your own wall types
  • Creating floors and roofs
  • Creating stairs and railings
  • Creating schedules and legends
  • Introduction to Materials and Rendering

Introduction to Revit Families

Families are the building blocks of Revit, and this course will cover the basics of families, including:

  • System families, Component families, and In-Place families.
  • When to use each type of family.
  • What is the difference between “Types” and “Instances” in a family?
  • Introduction to custom families – the real strength of Revit.

 

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BIM with Autodesk REVIT

BIM (Building Information Modeling) is the new buzzword in the AEC world. And for good reason – BIM can take an ordinary project and turn it into a dynamo – rich with information that can take your designs to a new level, and make them more valuable to clients.

This course will introduce you to the Revit environment, and get you and your office up to speed quickly. The focus is on optimizing the software for your needs, and getting set up to work as a team in BIM, as well as bring in other disciplines as necessary.

Setting up the Revit Environment

Template File Standards
Object Styles. Fonts, Tags, Title block, Schedules, Legends, Detail level, Browser organization

Optimize your Revit Workflow
Determine the best approach to the Revit transition
Incorporate your current CAD details into your Revit projects? Or detail exclusively in Revit?

Manage the Revit Project/Environment
Manage different phases of your projects.
Link drawing files, Revit files, and images.

Methods To Work As A Team
Develop a coordination strategy to manage projects across disciplines, and in different areas of the project. Copy / Monitor, Coordination Review, Interference Checking, The advantages of this BIM workflow also bring management challenges.

Worksharing
Setting up worksets (or “worksharing”) in Revit is an ideal way to allow multiple users to work on the same project at the same time.

Revit Families
Families in Revit are like blocks in AutoCAD – except more powerful, since they are parametric.

Phasing
Revit can set up existing and future phases to show (either internally or for a client or builder) the exact steps to a complicated structure.

Rooms, Areas, and Area Schemes
One reason to incorporate Revit into your workflow is to be able to use areas and area schemes. This provides the following advantages:

Design Options
This feature allows a user to design and view a project with two or more alternatives.

Detail for BIM with Autodesk REVIT

Setting up the Revit Environment

Possibly you have already done this, but it can save time to have everything set up in a way that will streamline your workflow.

 Template File Standards

  • Object Styles. These determine how objects look by default in Revit, and can be standardized. This includes 3D objects, annotation, and imported files.
  • Line Styles, Line Weights, and Line Patterns
  • Fonts
  • Tags, including development and management of custom tags
  • View Templates. Setting these up allows the user to easily change characteristics of items in a view such as scale, visibility, detail level, etc.
  • Title block. If needed, shared parameters can be added to title blocks to allow users more flexibility in changing items like initials, logos, subcontractor information, dates, etc. Parametric grid lines can also be added to sheets to line up plans and details.
  • Schedules . . . We will begin with the standard Revit schedules – Room Finish, Door and Window Schedules. Then we’ll go on to many other items you can schedule with Revit, and the ways this can help you. If you currently use Excel files for schedules, many fields missing from standard Revit schedules can be added with shared parameters.
  • Standard or typical legends are easily created and saved in the template file.
  • Detail level. Standards should be used to set how the project is viewed and plotted. This includes information such as proper scale for details and geometry for family creation.
  • Browser organization. This is how you navigate through sheets and views in the Revit This can be customized in the template file to organize the sheets and views to allow for faster and more efficient access. It can be adapted to different project needs, and is especially useful for projects that have specific or unique categories. This also speeds up larger projects by separating working views from documentation or presentation views

Many of these settings can copy your current CAD standards, which can help if you are thinking                about using a hybrid CAD/Revit approach to help the transition.

 

Optimize your Revit Workflow

  • Determine the best approach to the Revit transition
  • Incorporate your current CAD details into your Revit projects? Or detail exclusively in Revit?

 

Manage the Revit Project/Environment

  • Manage different phases of your projects. This includes creating “working” model views, and then sheets, issues and revisions. The project can be generated and saved under standard industry phases such as Schematic, Design Development, Construction Documents, and Record Drawings. There should be a file-naming standard for all of the stages of the project, especially if worksharing is utilized for the project. Determine how revisions will be tracked in the project.
  • Link drawing files, Revit files, and images. Linking files has many advantages. For larger projects, separate Revit models linked together or into a single sheet file can dramatically cut down on the file size. You can also have more than one user working on the separate files without the use of worksharing. This would also include linking CAD files into the Revit project, from your own office or from outside consultants.

 

Methods To Work As A Team

  • Develop a coordination strategy to manage projects across disciplines, and in different areas of the project. The underlying philosophy of Revit is to capture all the information in one project database. The use of worksets allows separate team members to work on different segments of the base model. With either linking or sharing a common database, the following tools can be used to enhance the shared workflow:
  • Copy / Monitor – this tool allows one discipline to create certain elements, such as floors or columns, and another discipline to copy these elements into their model for coordination purposes. Then any changes made to the model are “monitored” in other disciplines. The monitoring works both ways, with slightly different privileges, depending on which discipline created the element. There should be documented “best practices” for using the tool across disciplines.
  • Coordination Review – once different parts of the projects are linked together, this tool allows different disciplines to review warnings about changes to the monitored elements. It also facilitates communication between the different team members working on a single project.
  • Interference Checking – while this tool is available in a single model, its use in shared models is even more valuable as it provides a way to check for interferences across disciplines.

The advantages of this BIM workflow also bring management challenges. One important aspect of this will be the need of company strategy for the model management. This would incorporate all the features of using a template file as mentioned above, as well as additional organizational tasks that ensure that the project model is set up efficiently and coordinated properly. This includes the file structure on the server and individual workstations, defining the model position in the project environment, and the model organization.

 

Worksharing

Setting up worksets (or “worksharing”) in Revit is an ideal way to allow multiple users to work on the same project at the same time. This is easy to set up, and with some training your workers will soon be using this feature.

 

Revit Families

Families in Revit are like blocks in AutoCAD – except more powerful, since they are parametric. This training would begin with what Revit calls “System Families”, such as walls, roofs, floors, text, and dimensions. Learning these families is really the basis of learning Revit. Then we can progress to more custom component families (like furniture, moldings, etc.) based on your needs.

 

Phasing

Would there be any value to your company to show different phases for a project? This is helpful particularly for renovation projects. It is simple in Revit to set up existing and future phases to show (either internally or for a client or builder) the exact steps to a complicated structure. Graphic overrides are used to show phases in different line weights or even color to communicate the design intent more effectively.

 

Rooms, Areas, and Area Schemes

One reason to incorporate Revit into your workflow is to be able to use areas and area schemes. This provides the following advantages:

  • Set up different schemes to show the relationship between areas in a plan
  • Create schedules for the different schemes
  • View and print colored presentations of the schemes

 

Design Options

This feature allows a user to design and view a project with two or more alternatives. Do any of the project’s areas or parts need to show elements in different variations or style? This feature allows you to set up, view, and print all those different options. Then you simply “finalize” the design by making one of the options “primary”.

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